Literacy Links – Volume 98

book list, language study, literacy links, reading, writing
Anchor chart/student goal sheet for readers’ workshop

This week I’m helping launch a first grade readers’ workshop, so I mined my kindergarten resources for familiar reading goals from the Super Reader unit, also known as my favorite kindergarten Reading Unit of Study. Tomorrow, the first grade readers will get a plastic sheet protector to record the number of books they want to read and which super reader power they’ll use while reading. Can’t wait to see what goals they make for themselves. I just linked to this goal sheet on the LPS ELA calendar for this unit, but HERE it is if you’re an LPS employee.

Here is this week’s roundup of literacy links if you’re looking for some quick inspiration, tips, and refreshment:

Literacy Links – Volume 94

book list, coaching, creating, professional resources, racial justice, reading
Our rainbow runway for our end-of-the-year awards ceremony. The confetti (the remains of our scrap paper bin) was simultaneously my best and worst idea of the year.
But SO worth it.

Someone once doubted my ability to find the joy in teaching, and it was a very painful comment. How could they think that? Was my joy not enough? Or were the things I thought were joyful not obvious to an observer? With my joy-fidence rattled, I decided to infuse as much obviously, outwardly joyfulness into my teaching. We sang. We danced. We created colorful art. I’m pretty sure these are all things I would’ve done anyway, but that accusation practically made it my official goal for TeachPoint. Not such a bad thing after all.

Here is this week’s roundup of literacy links if you’re looking for some quick inspiration, tips, and refreshment:

Literacy Links – Volume 93

book clubs, book list, literacy links, professional resources, reading, summer, writing
My current favorite read aloud for the last day of school!

Man, I really wanted to publish Volume 100 by the end of this school year. Turns out being a full-time, *first-time* kindergarten teacher and full-time coach was too much even for an overachiever like me.

I don’t feel too bad though. I taught kids how to *read* this year (and even got them all to meet or exceed our district’s end of year benchmark ), a task I would’ve thought impossible fifteen years ago when I started teaching fifth grade. Turns out I’ve learned a lot in those fifteen years from people much smarter and more experienced than me AND I can do hard things. If I never forever endeavor, indeed.

Here is this week’s roundup of literacy links if you’re looking for some quick inspiration, tips, and refreshment:

Literacy Links – Volume 92

book list, literacy links, professional resources, summer
KV’s stained glass window display to celebrate the end of our geometry unit.

One of my favorite parts of teaching in The Now is the art that we’ve created. From plays for our theatre to this stained glass window display, we’ve been creators. Creating has been a great form of expression and even leads to more writing and reading. What a colorful year!

Here is this week’s roundup of literacy links if you’re looking for some quick inspiration, tips, and refreshment:

Literacy Links – Volume 91 *Poetry Edition*

book list, literacy links, poetry
The library of poetry picture books at the Poetry Foundation in Chicago, aka my version of heaven.

Two summers ago, in The Before, I attended the Summer Poetry Institute hosted by The Poetry Foundation (PoFo) in Chicago. It was a glorious week of being immersed in poetic forms and devices. I learned and learned and learned and wrote and wrote and wrote. I’m embarrassed to admit that I learned a new-to-me literary term: ars poetica, which means poems about poetry. My upcoming poetry display’s theme is going to be ars poetica, and I can’t wait to unveil it this week.

If you love or are intrigued by poetry, I urge you to consider any events hosted by PoFo. I might just change your life.

Here is this week’s roundup of POETRY links if you’re looking for some quick inspiration, tips, and refreshment:

Literacy Links – Volume 90

book list, literacy links, online learning, poetry, professional resources, writing

Our beloved post office transformed into a theatre recently! To help build students’ background knowledge, we watched a video of a backstage tour of a theatre and I’ve been reading at least one picture book a week about theatre. We’ve been so inspired we even wrote our very first play about our shared reading text, Gossie. I’ll be sure to promote its opening day show! 🙂

Here is this week’s roundup of literacy links if you’re looking for some quick inspiration, tips, and refreshment:

Literacy Links – Volume 87

book list, literacy links, online learning, professional resources
*Optional* Choice Board for families and students.

One of the many (endless?) struggles of remote teaching has been how much of my students’ days do I fill with learning? I, of course, want to grow their brains, but I also don’t want them to be in front of a screen *all* day. Another aspect to consider is their families: Some families want more structure and other families want less. I have no clear answer to my problem, but in the meantime, I created an optional choice board that’s going to provide families with optional activities. I tried to create meaningful activities that can work in many contexts, sort of like a center I might have in my classroom in The Before. I hope it’s helpful to those who use it.

Here is this week’s roundup of literacy links if you’re looking for some quick inspiration, tips, and refreshment:

Literacy Links -Volume 86

book list, coaching, early literacy, literacy links, math workshop, reading
One of my daily slides for our week of remote learning.

For the week after Thanksgiving, our district was remote. Remote is not the end of the world, but it is very different from in-person pandemic teaching (and light years away from teaching in The Before). The structure and routines that I teach students in class don’t necessarily translate to remote teaching. One of the biggest missing elements is turn and talk, an essential element of my classroom since I believe learning floats on a sea of talk. Remote teaching ends up being uncomfortably teacher-centered. But other routines could easily work in a remote environment, like using my name sticks to call on students to avoid Zoom chaos. I feel so foolish for needing a whole week to realize this, but that’s my brain’s processing speed in The Now. Here’s to a better online learning session next time.

Here is this week’s roundup of literacy links if you’re looking for some quick inspiration, tips, and refreshment:

Literacy Links – Volume 84

book list, literacy links, math workshop
The sign = the rainbow connection scrap

A few weeks ago, I learned that I would be teaching kindergarten in November if the School Committee approved a new proposal. They approved, and a two week countdown began. Between monster cutting and laminating sessions, I decided to collage a cover for a kindergarten notebook for all of my ideas, to-do lists, and PD. I usually collage my PD notebooks, so whenever I find an image, quote, pattern, logo, etc. that strikes me, I stash it in a folder for my future covers. So I pulled out my folder, and the image above is what I found. I nearly gasped. I’d already decided on a rainbow theme for my room and the biggest word scrap in my pile said “the rainbow connection”. I took it as a sign, and I felt so much excitement.

Here is this week’s roundup of literacy links if you’re looking for some quick inspiration, tips, and refreshment:

Literacy Links – Volume 78

book list, literacy links, professional resources, writing
Fiction Learning Progressions for 2nd Grade
Nonfiction Learning Progressions for 2nd Grade

As a literacy coach, I usually have to stretch across six grades, so it’s a treat to focus on a single grade level this year. I’m pumped to be assigned to second grade for hybrid support, but the coach in me can’t help not coaching. As such, I’ve decided to develop toolkits for reading and writing. I’m going to pull from lots of sources: The Literacy Continuum, the Units of Study, and more. First up? Creating a fiction learning progression and nonfiction learning progression (only available to LPS teachers since we have already purchased the Units of Study for our teachers) to help teachers choose focuses for units, conferences, or read alouds. This may just become one of my goals this year…

Here is the first official roundup of literacy links of the 2020-2021 school year if you’re looking for some quick inspiration, tips, and refreshment: