SMP #3

I created my very first glog (I created a trial week-long Glogster account), and it’s about Standard of Mathematical Practice #3: Construct a viable argument and critique the reasoning of others. This SMP is my favorite because I believe it has the greatest impact on students’ learning across ALL subjects. When students have to discuss their reasoning, they all benefit. See what these students shared in their exit slips after a whole-class share of work on a low floor high ceiling problem from youcubed:

I love that they used words/phrases like: “get more ideas for later” and “yet.” This implies that not only were they engaged with the task, but they also benefitted from the discussion because it “gave me an idea.”

Students can share in a variety of ways:

  • whole class after a week of working on the problem during Math Workshop
  • small group work – this way a teacher can hear the math talk and encourage students to share with the whole class later
  • fish bowl discussion – all students can benefit from reflecting on what went well and what could be better

How do you get students to share their reasoning or the critique reasoning of others?

Musical Punctuation

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In the past ten years of my teaching career, I’ve avoided doing worksheets of punctuation practice because I haven’t seen students’ writing improve. Instead I’ve seen students work on them, seem to be proficient at using punctuation marks because all of the fill in the blanks are correct or the sentences have been edited appropriately, and then submit drafts without a lick of proper punctuation! Although *I* could fill a book the size of Oxford’s Dictionary with all of the conventions and grammar worksheets *I* did as a student, I don’t believe this single method made me proficient at using correct punctuation. Since this approach hasn’t shown me evidence of its effectiveness, and with time already weighing heavily on my daily routine, I tried to find a more beneficial use of classroom instruction for my students.

So for years, I attended to conventions instruction in one-on-one conferences and small group strategy lessons during writers’ workshop or in my thirty- minute blocks of language study. I would meet with students and do mini-lessons on the proper use of quotation marks in their narratives or making words possessive before asking them to edit their own drafts. Although this process was more fruitful than the wasteful worksheets I had used early in my career, I still felt students deserved something better, more meaningful.

When I saw a session at Literacy for All 2015 titled, “Practical Punctuation: Teaching Mechanics In The Writing Workshop (Grades 3–8),” I signed up. I was not expecting to be thrilled by punctuation instruction possibilities. I mean, how exciting can punctuation be?

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Turns out, this session was by far my favorite at Literacy for All 2015! The presenter, Dan Feigelson, shared his inquiry-based approach to punctuation during his session by asking, “How can we make students thoughtful punctuation decision-makers?” His thesis really struck me: punctuation is as much of an author’s choice as word choice. For instance, we’ve all read a piece of student’s writing that spans a page or more with no periods. Yet, no one would argue with Charlotte Bronte’s status as an eminent author for composing a sentence such as this in Jane Eyre:

Women are supposed to be very calm generally; but women feel just as men feel; they need exercise for their faculties, and field for their efforts, as much as their brothers do; they suffer from too rigid a restraint, too absolute a stagnation, precisely as men would suffer; and it is narrow-minded in their more privileged fellow-creatures to say that they ought to confine themselves to making puddings and knitting stockings, to playing on the piano and embroidering bags. (page 123)

Mr. Feigelson’s constructivist methods allow students to explore the nuances of our language and make sense of the musical-like markings. This way, students come to see punctuation as purposeful rather than rules that have to be followed.

The general procedure for a punctuation inquiry mini-unit follows this framework:

  • allow students to explore a collection of mentor texts with the focus of noticing the author’s use of a certain punctuation mark, like commas or quotation marks
  • students collect sample sentences from mentor texts and classify them by common traits; this could be part of their daily independent reading (at school and/or home)
  • students create their OWN names and definitions for these traits
  • students experiment with this new punctuation on drafts they’ve already written
  • celebrate the revisions using a document camera; show the before and after drafts and have the author describe his/her punctuating choices

With this approach, the amount of ownership and creation makes punctuation seem less like rules imposed from a higher, unknown being and more like a useful tool for self-expression.

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After the mini-unit, there are many extension possibilities:

  • have students copy one of their own sentences and then justify every punctuation choice
  • after an interactive read aloud, pull interestingly punctuated sentences from the text to examine and discuss the author’s choices
  • choose a model sentence from a mentor text, and have students revise one of their own sentences in the manner of the mentor author
  • create a classroom how-to punctuation manual

Mr. Feigelson’s balance of inquiry and direct instruction strikes the perfect balance between teaching skills and purposeful, meaningful writing composition.

Heinemann has a sample of Dan Feigelson’s book, Practical Punctuation, to whet your punctuating appetite, or you can borrow my copy of the book from my office! If you’re a MPS elementary teacher, let me know if you’re interested in coplanning a mini-unit on punctuation inquiry! I also drafted a punctuation mini-unit that you can roll out and tweak.

Happy composing!

Quote Creators

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I love finding inspiring quotes in the books I’m reading! In fact, my students have a whole section of their reading notebooks devoted to quote collecting. It’s impactful work because it encourages:

  • “reading like a writer.” Being aware of how words are composed influences and excites us as writers. I want my writing to have the same kind of impact!
  • vocabulary acquisition. Often, my favorite quotes have some unusual, inspiring word choice. The conversations we’ve had in class while dissecting the nuanced meaning of words in quotes have been some of my most powerful teaching moments.
  • reading an author’s body of work. I know that Sharon Creech will always have some stimulating nuggets. She has such a gift with words!

Three FREE websites I’ve found and used to turn quotes from students’ readings into something you’d find on Etsy are Recite.comQuotescover.com, and Quozio.com. You can choose different styles, colors, and fonts! Have fun playing around, and happy reading!

Back to School 2015!

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Just a little back to school fun from Hogwarts for all the Potterheads out there (can you spot your favorite characters from the series in the print above?)! It’s going to be a magical year!

Middleboro Wishes Harry Potter a Happy Birthday!

For assignment #7, Potterheads created birthday cards for Harry. Harry would’ve LOVED these!

Payton’s birthday card for Harry:

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John’s birthday tidings for Harry:

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Charlie’s birthday wish for Harry:

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Killian’s birthday greetings:

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Harry Potter Virtual Book Club Assignment #8: The LAST Task

This is it, Potterheads. The LAST chunk of The Sorcerer’s Stone and the LAST assignment. There are only the last three chapters for you to read, and they’re so exciting, I won’t be surprised if you finish them in one sitting. Since I’m posting this a bit late, let’s make sure you’ve finished the book by August 17th.

In this post, I shared one of my favorite quotes from this book: “It does not do to dwell on dreams and forget to live.” Not only do I love the alliteration, but I also love the message. Whenever I’m reading a book that moves me, I always record meaningful quotes. This is what real readers do! When we find a book we love, we revisit it again and again trying to reveal significant or even new moments. I ❤ reading.

For your LAST assignment I want you to find a quote that means something to you from The Sorcerer’s Stone. The quote doesn’t have to be from the final three chapters (although there are some gems there); it can be from anywhere in the whole novel. Don’t forget to note WHO says the quote: it might be a character or J.K. Rowling. Once you’ve found your quote, send me the following info in an email, blog post comment, a note dropped off at HBB or MKG’s office to be put in my mailbox, a snail mail via the HBB or MKG’s office, whatever:

  • the whole quote
  • who said it
  • your name
  • your new teacher for the the 2015-2016 school year

If you send me all of this info before August 17th, I’ll have a special delivery for you in the first week of school. It may or may not involve an owl. 🙂

Happy final reading, Potterheads!

Harry Potter Virtual Book Club Assignment #7: Happy Birthday, Harry!

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We’re SO close to the end! In fact, if you’ve been pacing yourself with my weekly assignments, I predict you won’t be able to resist finishing the book after you read the next two chapters! Go ahead and devour what remains if you wish! However, I’m only going to assign chapters 13 and 14 for Friday, August 7th.

This week’s assignment deviates from our reading of The Sorcerer’s Stone in order to celebrate Harry’s birthday, which is on July 31st! Make Harry a birthday card telling him why you like having him as a friend. Your card can be in the voice of any Hogwarts character OR simply YOU. Won’t Harry be surprised when owls start delivering these cards to him on Privet Drive (he’ll be there for summer break)?! Let’s make this birthday a memorable one!

As always, send me a photo of your card and birthday message, and I’ll post them on this site next week!

Happy reading!