Literacy Links – Volume 9

literacy links

This past Tuesday, the LPS literacy coaches led teachers in grades 2-5 in a morning of PD on writing about reading, and it was my favorite PD ever! As always, we used the Workshop Model structure, so that teachers had the most time to explore their choice of resources. So after a twenty minute minilesson to build some background knowledge on writing about reading, they floated from station to station as needed. The stations we planned included unpacking literacy resources like the Literacy Continuum and the Learning Progressions from the Units of Study, thin slicing student work samples, calibrating assessments, analyzing student work, and making a writing about reading toolkit. I, of course, left their 3-2-1 reflections in my car before I left for Seattle, but I can’t wait to review their reflections, provide feedback, and begin our coaching follow-up work.

Here is this week’s roundup of literacy links for some quick inspiration, tips, and refreshment:

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Toolkit Ideas for Writing About Reading

literacy, professional resources, reading, test prep, writing

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A quick search for “toolkits” in the Units of Study Facebook groups will yield dozens of posts with requests for and pictures of various toolkits. They are certainly a hot topic. However, I haven’t seen many that focus on writing about reading, a component of balanced literacy that students are expected to do throughout the year in a variety of contexts. As a result, we’ve begun gathering and creating some sample toolkit pages on this Padlet. Browse for inspiration, and post your writing about reading toolkit pages, too!

Literacy Links – Volume 8

literacy links

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Nancie Atwell at Literacy for All 2018. Note the overhead projector. 😉

There’s nothing quite like meeting an literacy idol. I’ve loved Nancie Atwell’s ideas and school since I read In the Middle as part of my writing methods class in grade school. I’ve practically been counting the days until LFA 2018 since I saw the poster ad at the end of LFA 2017. So you know I sat in the front row of her session on writing conferences. My favorite line? “You get 15 exclamation points to use. During your whole life. Use them wisely.” I don’t think I’ve used one since. 🙂

Here is this week’s roundup of literacy links for some quick inspiration, tips, and refreshment:

 

Literacy Links – Volume 7

literacy links

Last weekend, six teachers joined me on a whirlwind trip to New York City for a day of learning at Teachers College. The hour-long workshops were jam-packed with ideas and inspiration, some easy to implement immediately and others more big picture inspiration. However, the day started with a somber, but powerful keynote address by children’s author, Kate DiCamillo. She began by reading aloud the beginning of her latest novel, Louisiana’s Way Home, the sequel to MCBA nominee, Raymie Nightingale. There’s nothing like an author reading aloud his/her own work.

Here is this week’s roundup of literacy links for some quick inspiration, tips, and refreshment:

Literacy Links – Volume 6

literacy links

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On Saturday, some LPS teachers are heading to the Teachers College Reading Writing Project’s Saturday Reunion. Central Office GENEROUSLY funded a cushy bus ride for us to go to NYC for a whirlwind, brain-busting day of learning with Lucy Calkins and her staff developers. I can’t wait to get my learn on. Don’t worry–I’ll share the gems here. 🙂

Here is this week’s roundup of literacy links for some quick inspiration, tips, and refreshment:

Literacy Links – Volume 5

literacy links

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Y’all know how much I love the Fountas and Pinnell Literacy Continuum! If my office was on fire, this would be the first professional resource I’d rescue. So much support to make my teaching as responsive and strategic as possible. I have big plans to encourage the use of this book, so we just got SIX copies of our very own in the book room so that you don’t have to fork over $75. Come check one out today!

Here is this week’s roundup of literacy links for some quick inspiration, tips, and refreshment:

Literacy Links – Volume 4

literacy links

My book talk vs. student book talk

There is nothing that gets students reading more than book talks! I used to have students write their book talks out on 5×8 inch index cards, but over the years, I’ve come to realize that I love the natural, off-the-cuff book talks more. They’re more authentic, personal, and casual. If the point is to introduce as many books to kids as possible, I want them to be easy and appealing to implement. So I model sharing the title, the author, my favorite elements, and the types of readers for whom I think it would be “just right”. Then, students take over and start giving their own book talks! Whoever’s giving the book talk, students simply add the titles of books they want to read to their “Books to Read” lists in their Reading Notebooks so that they have ideas about what to read next. The “Books to Read” list is something you can refer to during Reading Conferences, too!

Here is this week’s roundup of literacy links for some quick inspiration, tips, and refreshment:

Literacy Links – Volume 3

literacy links

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This past Wednesday, my husband, oldest son, brother, sister-in-law, and good friend all met at the Lyric Theatre in New York City to see Harry Potter and the Cursed Child. It was magically extraordinary. I wept during the bows because I didn’t want it to end. If you have a Potterhead in your life, move mountains to see this play. It’s THAT amazing.

Here is this week’s roundup of literacy links for some quick inspiration, tips, and refreshment:

Literacy Links – Volume 2

literacy links

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Phase 1 of Center’s new Reading Lounge is open for business! Check the Google Calendar to find an available time to bring your class. Don’t forget to bring your book, too. Happy reading!

Here is this week’s roundup of literacy links for some quick inspiration, tips, and refreshment:

Literacy Links – Volume 1

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For a literacy coach, the beginning of the school year can feel a bit off. We love our teachers and students, but we want classroom teachers to have time to get to their new kiddos, so we take a temporary hands-off approach leaving us in offices to tend to necessary administrivia. When we finally return to our beloved work with students and teachers teaching and coplanning, it’s like a chocolate-covered espresso bean right to our classroom-loving hearts. Hope your year has started smoothly. Here is the first roundup of literacy links in my new weekly series for some quick inspiration and tips: