Literacy Links – Volume 16

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I’ve been digging into Patterns of Power A LOT lately. And I’m loving it even more than I did last year. Ten minutes a day. Very little prep. Student-centered. Inquiry-based. Most beneficially, it raises students’ language consciousness. They are more aware of their choices as writers and the effects their choices make on their readers. Let me know if you’re interested in exploring POP together.

Here is this week’s roundup of literacy links for some quick inspiration, tips, and refreshment:

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Literacy Links – Volume 15

literacy links

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I hope everyone had a great break from school! Whenever I travel, I make a point to visit literary locations: bookstores, libraries, authors’ homes, etc. Over break, I visited my old stomping grounds in NYC and checked out the public library and Books Are Magic, a Brooklyn bookstore. It was, indeed, magical. The children’s section in the back had a hexagonal book nook that my two year-old thoroughly enjoyed. I can’t wait to go back!

Here is this week’s roundup of literacy links for some quick inspiration, tips, and refreshment:

Literacy Links – Volume 14

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Students as content creators is my jam. This week, my WINners (OMG, I’m totally calling them that from now on!) are working through the writing process to develop book recommendations of favorite books from their childhoods. On this WINners desk, we see a marked up text full of his reading thinking, pre-writing using a graphic organizer of his choice that we modeled, a flash draft, and a personal revising and editing checklists for himself, a partner, and the teacher. The WINners’ recommendations are going to be published in a book that will be on display in the library along with all of the books. We’re also giving a copy of the book recommendations to each kindergarten class to inspire their independent reading selections.

Here is this week’s roundup of literacy links for some quick inspiration, tips, and refreshment:

Literacy Links – Volume 13

literacy links

IMG_9854Fifth grader’s picture book recommendation pre-writing.

In our last two weeks of this WIN rotation, fifth graders are taking a break from the test prep version of writing about reading and, instead, focusing on a more purposeful, engaging form of writing about reading: telling their kindergarten buddies about their favorite picture books. They have each revisited their favorite picture books from their single digit age days to share with their buddies. They still have to provide reasons, evidence, and elaboration, but having a true audience has been so much more motivating. I can’t wait for students to collect their book recommendations and deliver the student-written book to each kindergarten classroom!

Here is this week’s roundup of literacy links for some quick inspiration, tips, and refreshment:

Literacy Links – Volume 12

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I love this series from Hey, Kiddo by local author, Jarrett Krosoczka, of Lunch Lady and Star Wars: Jedi Academy fame. I can’t help but think about students who *need* reading and writing as outlets, too. Are we providing them opportunities to express themselves? How can we incorporate more open-ended tasks in our jam-packed, short school day? Lots to consider.

Here is this week’s roundup of literacy links for some quick inspiration, tips, and refreshment:

Literacy Links – Volume 11

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It’s the most wonderful time of the year. The holidays? Nah–it’s the BOOK FAIR! There are SO many amazing titles being offered this round; I’m pretty sure my wishlist totals over $200. So many books, so few funds.

Here is this week’s roundup of literacy links for some quick inspiration, tips, and refreshment:

Literacy Links – Volume 10

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I’m so grateful to be in a district that supplies its teachers with a classroom library. A teacher will always buy specific books that are popular or might interest particular students, but to have a foundation library is such a rare gift. Thank you, Longmeadow Public Schools.

Here is this week’s roundup of literacy links for some quick inspiration, tips, and refreshment:

Literacy Links – Volume 9

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This past Tuesday, the LPS literacy coaches led teachers in grades 2-5 in a morning of PD on writing about reading, and it was my favorite PD ever! As always, we used the Workshop Model structure, so that teachers had the most time to explore their choice of resources. So after a twenty minute minilesson to build some background knowledge on writing about reading, they floated from station to station as needed. The stations we planned included unpacking literacy resources like the Literacy Continuum and the Learning Progressions from the Units of Study, thin slicing student work samples, calibrating assessments, analyzing student work, and making a writing about reading toolkit. I, of course, left their 3-2-1 reflections in my car before I left for Seattle, but I can’t wait to review their reflections, provide feedback, and begin our coaching follow-up work.

Here is this week’s roundup of literacy links for some quick inspiration, tips, and refreshment:

Literacy Links – Volume 8

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Nancie Atwell at Literacy for All 2018. Note the overhead projector. 😉

There’s nothing quite like meeting an literacy idol. I’ve loved Nancie Atwell’s ideas and school since I read In the Middle as part of my writing methods class in grade school. I’ve practically been counting the days until LFA 2018 since I saw the poster ad at the end of LFA 2017. So you know I sat in the front row of her session on writing conferences. My favorite line? “You get 15 exclamation points to use. During your whole life. Use them wisely.” I don’t think I’ve used one since. 🙂

Here is this week’s roundup of literacy links for some quick inspiration, tips, and refreshment:

 

Literacy Links – Volume 7

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Last weekend, six teachers joined me on a whirlwind trip to New York City for a day of learning at Teachers College. The hour-long workshops were jam-packed with ideas and inspiration, some easy to implement immediately and others more big picture inspiration. However, the day started with a somber, but powerful keynote address by children’s author, Kate DiCamillo. She began by reading aloud the beginning of her latest novel, Louisiana’s Way Home, the sequel to MCBA nominee, Raymie Nightingale. There’s nothing like an author reading aloud his/her own work.

Here is this week’s roundup of literacy links for some quick inspiration, tips, and refreshment: